Idaho Centennial Trail

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Idaho Centennial Trail

Portions of the Idaho Centennial Trail can be found in the areas around Sun Valley and the Wood River Valley in the Sawtooth National Forest and National Recreation Area. Read More

  • The sections of the Idaho Centennial Trails that are found near the Wood River Valley pass through all types of ecological zones
  • The ICT follows existing trails and primitive backcountry roads throughout the state.
  • The section of the ICT that runs through the area closest to Sun Valley is roughly 300 miles long.

Overview

The Idaho Centennial Trail extends over 1200 miles from the Nevada border north to the border with Canada. The route was established in 1986 by Roger Williams, a member of the Idaho Trails Council. Portions of the Idaho Centennial Trail can be found in the areas around Sun Valley and the Wood River Valley in the Sawtooth National Forest and National Recreation Area, the Challis, Boise, Payette and Nez Perce National Forests, and the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Check with the Public Land Information Center to make sure you get the correct maps for the segment you are using.

The sections of the Idaho Centennial Trails that are found near the Wood River Valley pass through all types of ecological zones. The visitor can find himself or herself surrounded by old growth cedar trees, pristine glacial lakes, rocky, rugged peaks, lush green forests, granite spires reaching to the sky, fast flowing rivers, meandering streams and open meadows. The wildlife along the way is just as varied as the landscape.
Depending on what section of the Trail you are using, you can find yourself on single-track trails, dirt roads, or jeep trails.

The Trail is designated so that any type of user can enjoy the finest Idaho experience. In the wilderness area north of the Wood River Valley, the Idaho Centennial Trail branches in two directions, so that those who are using mountain bikes, snowmobiles, trail bikes, or ATV's can continue on the trail without violating the rules of the wilderness.

Trailhead

For the fans of wilderness and remote country, the ICT runs almost continuously through the Sawtooth Wilderness, the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness and the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness for a distance of more 300 miles. The trail also courses along the famed Middle Fork of the Salmon River.

The Idaho Centennial Trail (ICT) follows existing trails and primitive backcountry roads throughout the state. Most people start at the southern trailhead near Murphy Hot Springs on the Idaho-Nevada border in early June, and travel north across the desert before it gets too hot. Then, they proceed toward the Sawtooth Mountains in mid-July, when most of the snow has melted from the high country. Then it’s a race against time to reach the Idaho-British Columbia border by late September or early October.

It winds for hundreds of miles through some of the most remote country Idaho has to offer. Lonely sagebrush plains, imposing mountain ranges, stark river canyons, and rain soaked forests .

Details

  • Distance: The total distance of the Idaho Centennial Trail is 1200 miles. The section that runs through the area closest to Sun Valley is roughly 300 miles long.
  • Average Time of Hike: The time to complete any portion of the Idaho Centennial Trail is dependent on what portion or portions of the hike you are completing.
  • Elevation Gain: The elevation gain, too, changes dependent on the area where you are hiking.
  • Difficulty: Some areas of the Trail can be quite difficult while other sections are easier to do.
  • Trail Type: One way
  • Trailhead: To get to the Idaho Centennial Trail in the area of Sun Valley, it is best to check with the Sawtooth national Recreation Area to determine which trails in the area join the ICT.

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