Snake River Idaho Fly Fishing, Camping, Boating

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Snake River

As a designated "wild and scenic" river, the Snake River will provide an unforgettable experience no matter how you choose to experience it.

  • The Snake River winds through several states, measuring in at roughly 1,038 miles.
  • The Snake River is designated as a “Wild and Scenic River”.
  • Depending on which part of the Snake River you visit, you can have vastly different experiences.

Overview

The Snake River winds through several states, measuring in at roughly 1,038 miles. It enters Idaho in the town of Rigby, and continues through the state providing great fishing and rafting opportunities in several different areas.

Location & Information

Rising in western Wyoming, the river flows westwards through the Snake River Plain, and turns north to empty into the Columbia at the Tri-Cities area of the state of Washington, draining 108,000 square miles in parts of six U.S. states.

Activities

Depending on which part of the Snake River you visit, you can have vastly different experiences. From fishing Henry's Fork to rafting Hell's Canyon, the Snake is a river with diverse environments and there are ample opportunities to take advantage of them. Fishing the Snake is a unique experience offering a wide variety of water and fish. Anglers come from all over to experience Henry's Fork, a stretch that consists of nearly 100 miles of the river, including Box Canyon and the Lower River.

Much of this area is located about 200 miles from Sun Valley. For rafting, there are plenty of great places in Idaho to experience the famous whitewater of the Snake, but Hell's Canyon is the final stretch and also the best. As one of the deepest canyons in the world, the class III and IV rapids and amazing sights provide a thrilling experience on a multi-day trip.

Fun Facts

The name Snake River was derived from an S-shaped gesture the Shoshone tribe made with their hands to represent swimming salmon. Explorers misinterpreted it to represent a snake, giving the river its present-day name.

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